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Image by bolshakov used under a Creative Commons license.

Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast (Scribner, 1996).
Hemingway’s famous memoir of Paris in the 1920s, before he was rich and famous, and before his days there became the stuff of legend. Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, James Joyce, F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Ford Madox Ford and John Dos Passos walk these pages; Hemingway remembers many of them uncharitably, particularly the Fitzgeralds.  Hemingway wrote the book decades later, add and It was published posthumously under the supervision his fourth wife, who some say put her own cast on things.  It was all too good to be true, and indeed Hemingway suggests in the foreward that readers may regard it as fiction. Nonetheless, many of the locations that he describes can still be found today.

This on-line companion to Hemingway’s Paris is a pretty neat resource. R.M. Wittingslow posts a passage. Robin posts some too. Charles Poore reviewed it in The New York Times. Jonathan Yardley reconsidered it in The Washington Post. Sadie Jones read it when she was living in Paris in her 20s. Michael Palin trailed Hemingway in Paris. Ric Erickson tracked down places described in the book. Harold Stephens did too, and Riana Lagarde recommends a four-hour walk. Don George (Salon) calls it literary comfort food. Softspoken found a picture of Gertrude Stein with Hemingway’s son, back in the day. Red Star Café offers a favorable review. According to lofotenmoose, it’s Hemingway’s most satisfying work. Mark Shaw tells aspiring writers to read it. litlove enjoyed it but found Hemingway’s voice strange. Michael Burke finds something different each time he goes back. Brian Oard sees much bathos. Becky made it through the third time. Craig Terlson loves Hemingway. Gigi liked him more after reading it. Markin calls it a little gold mine of insights. Juliette Crane doesn’t want to be like him. Wendy was transported to 1985. The Emily fell in love with Hemingway. This Excentric has a picture of Hemingway back then. And Paul’s blog is right on point.

Buy it at Amazon.com.

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